Friday, March 14, 2008

SMGF Participants Receive Special Offer from GeneTree

I received this e-mail today from the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation:

Dear SMGF participant,

Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation (SMGF) is excited to announce that your personalized DNA results are now available from the Sorenson mtDNA database, through a special offer made by GeneTree, a family networking website. Eligible participants may obtain their mtDNA-HVI, II, III results and pedigree information for a special introductory price of just $19.50. Comparable tests cost over $150!

With your mtDNA results in hand you can explore new and exciting genetic-genealogy territory by taking advantage of GeneTree's:

  • Tools for making connections with mtDNA cousins
  • Resources for interpreting mtDNA results
  • Innovative tools for discovering migration patterns of ancient and recent ancestors
  • Media sharing and storage capacity for pictures, video and other media

To be eligible for this offer you must have requested an SMGF participation kit prior to October 23, 2007 and returned your kit prior to Dec 31, 2007. To view promotion details and get your mtDNA results please click here.

We encourage you to take advantage of this special GeneTree introductory offer!

Sincerely,
The SMGF Team

Unlock and view your personal mtDNA results now at GeneTree.com

SMGF takes great care in protecting your confidential information. SMGF does not transfer or share data with third parties without explicit donor consent.


I took a free DNA test two years ago during a local Family History Conference presented by the LDS church here in Spokane. SMGF sponsored the tests, which had to be submitted with a four- (or more) generation pedigree chart. At the time, the results were not available to the participants, but were used in comparing random DNA data collected from around the world.

This looks intriguing...I think I'll participate, especially considering Blaine's got a free new ebook available explaining DNA test results in layman's terminology at his blog, The Genetic Genealogist.
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